Ardsley Park Homes For Sale

Ardsley Park-Chatham Crescent is a large, highly intact residential area developed, beginning in 1910 as two adjacent planned subdivisions. The plan of Ardsley Park, a regular grid with landscaped squares, is extremely important to the fabric of historic Savannah as it is a twentieth century variant of Oglethorpe’s original city plan.

In 1985, Ardsley Park and Chatham Crescent were named to the National Register of Historic Places under the collective name of Ardsley Park. Ardsley Park’s central location, its physical beauty and strong property values positions it as one of Savannah’s most desirable communities. Thanks to a strong and active neighborhood association as well other community-minded residents Ardsley regularly lands on “Best of…” lists in local publications. The various parks, broad streetscapes, and lush canopy encourage walking, biking and running. Waters Avenue and Abercorn are direct routes both Downtown and to the Southside and Victory Drive is a straight shot to the Islands. So, Downtown is only ten minutes away and one can be on Tybee Island in about twenty minutes.  Also, Ardsley Park abuts the Ardmore community, home to red-hot Habersham Village with its shops, restaurants and bars as well as diamond-shaped Hull Park, which has become a popular, kid-friendly recreational site.

The nearby distractions of a stunning and historic city, the promise of its beaches and Low Country, and a unique urban environment and fabric find Ardsley Park situated at the apex of all things that rate “Best of..” in Savannah.

Prior to the development a section of Victory Drive was known as Estill Avenue and was a beautiful grass and palmetto lined street with grand homes. It was expanded and renamed in 1919 as a memorial to all of the soldiers, sailors and marines who died from Chatham County in World War I. It extends all the way from Ogeechee Road out to Tybee Island and is believed to be the longest palm-lined corridor in the world. Immediately adjacent to Ardsley Park is one of Savannah’s green jewels-Daffin Park.

Designed in 1907 by landscape architect John Nolen, a student of Frederick Law Olmsted, Daffin Park was built as a formal Beaux Arts-style park with two circular nodes joined to the four corners by tree-lined diagonal roads. The park is home to Grayson Stadium, a minor league 8,000 seat baseball stadium. It is the home field of the Savannah Bananas minor league baseball team and is also the part-time home of the Savannah State University college baseball team. Known as “Historic Grayson Stadium” it was built in 1926 and is the oldest working minor league ballpark in America.

Where The Locals Go 

Neighboring Communities

PARKSIDE – The Parkside neighborhood, so named because the community borders Savannah’s stunning Daffin Park, runs west to east from Waters Avenue to Bee Road and from Washington Avenue to around 52nd St from north to south. Parkside features architectural styles built throughout Georgia during the first half of the 20th century, including Craftsman, Colonial Revival, Cape Cod and English Vernacular Revival. In Daffin Park, Grayson Stadium is an excellent example of World War II-era stadium design.

BALDWIN PARK – Nestled to the southeast of Savannah’s Victorian District is the quaint residential neighborhood of Baldwin Park. Within these few blocks you can see an architectural timeline of downtown Savannah. From the Victorian homes and mansions that line its border on Victory Drive to the early 20th century bungalows that make up most of the neighborhood, every home has character and charm. Originally this neighborhood was part of the Chatham Crescent development, an area known for its curvilinear streets, roundabouts, and parks. With the creation of Victory Drive in 1919 Chatham Crescent was separated, and the north end became what is today known as Baldwin Park.

MIDTOWN – Midtown is convenient to all Savannah area attractions and is within minutes to all areas of the city and the islands. Savannah real estate development in the Midtown area began in the 1930’s with Ardsley Park being the first Savannah subdivision. Ardsley Park and the neighboring Chatham Crescent feature many Victorian homes are on the National Register of Historic Districts.

 

Home Styles in Ardsley Park

Home to almost every home style popular in the early twentieth century

Chatham Crescent is a rare example in Georgia of a Beaux Arts influenced “City Beautiful” type plan with a grand mall, crescent-shaped avenues, and small circular parks incorporated into a basic grid pattern. The idea was the brainstorm of Harry Hays Lattimore, William Lattimore and anonymous partners in the Ardsley Park Land Corporation. No one is certain how the Ardsley name evolved though some have theorized that it was borrowed from a British neighborhood.

The northern and western boundaries of Ardsley Park were marked at Estill Avenue and Bull Street by an impressive looking retaining wall made of Belgian block similar to those used as ballast on ships sailing from England. At key intersections stone pillars with Spanish-looking tile roofs marked the entrances to the park. The neighborhood is also bounded by Waters Avenue to the East and 58th Street to the South. The architectural styles in this historic district include textbook and local interpretations of almost every revival and eclectic style popular in the early twentieth century.

The centerpiece of the development was to be at the end of the palmetto-lined mall stretching between Maupas Avenue and 47th Street – a magnificent tourist facility called the Hotel Georgia. The Spanish Revival-style hotel was designed by noted architect Henrik Wallin, who assisted Henry Bacon with New York’s Astor Hotel. The developers hoped that wealthy Northerners would check into what was to be a luxurious hotel and decide to purchase a second home in Chatham Crescent – Ardsley Park.

Unfortunately, the hotel encountered numerous problems and barely got off the ground. Eventually, Savannah High School (now the Savannah Arts Academy) was built on the nearly eight acres of land set aside for the hotel. Early photographs show very little greenery and reveal that the developers planted over 5,000 trees under the direction of Georges Henri Bignault Sr., a landscape architect trained at the Ecole de Beaux Arts. Today they form tree canopies and shade most of this beautiful neighborhood.


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